Monday, December 11, 2017
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No. 356 Squadron RAF

Chum Phon. Photo Courtesy Of Christopher Kendall.

Bridge over the River Kwai. Photo Courtesy Of Joe Carberry.

Barrack Area Mandalay 13/1/45 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Dumps, Bangkok 27/3/45 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Gun Emplacement Ywabo Hill 12/2/45 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Hnon Pladuk Siam 28/10/44. Showing proximity of POW camp to railway! Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

16.11.45 Pak Nam Phra Loco Sheds 300 from feet. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Jumbhorn Siam Loco Straddled. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Khad Huagang Burma 22/11/44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Khao Huagang Turning On. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Lewe Airfield '6' Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Lewe Airfield '6' Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Lewe Airfield '6' Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Lewe Airfield '6' Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry

Marasan Rly Workshops Bangkok First Run 2/11/44 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Moulmein 19/10/44 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Moulmein 22-10-44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Moulmein 22-10-44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Moulmein Dock Area 19/10/44 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Pak Nam Phra Siam 16/11/44 Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Pak Nam Phra SIAM 16/11/44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Pak Nam Phra SIAM 16/11/44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Rangoon Dumps 17/3/45. Pathfinders for B-29's Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Rangoon Dumps 17/3/45. Pathfinders for B-29's Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Singaingmyo Burma 20/2/45. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Taungui Dumps Burma 21/12/44. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Bridge Over The River Kwai. Picture Courtesy of Joe Carberry.

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. A bomb exploding on the west end of the lock gate of the Klong Damneum Sadauk canal under a low-level daylight air attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. At the same time, Klong Phasi Charoen canal was under attack by other Liberator aircraft of No. 356 Squadron RAF. These two canals were important elements of a large waterways system in the Bangkok area being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route and the damage caused by the air attacks reduced their efficiency by approximately 80%. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. Bombs exploding on the west end of the lock gates on the Klong Phasi Charoen canal. Lock gates on the western canal system of Thailand between twenty five and fifty five miles from Bangkok were destroyed at three points in a low level daylight air attack by Liberator bomber aircraft of No. 356 Squadron RAF, Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. The attacks were carried out on the fancifully-named 'Comfortable King's Way' (Klong Damneum Sadauk) and the 'Prosperous Revenues' (Klong Phasi Charoen) canals, which were being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route owing to the destruction of railway bridges around Bangkok by Allied bombing. The wrecking of the lock gates has left the canals navigable only at high tides and has reduced their efficiency by approximately 80%. Turned into a military waterway by the Japanese the canals were filled with small craft and power barges. These were also attacked. The two canals run from Bangkok river to Banggondi, on the Meklong River, fifty miles south west of Bangkok, and are about 100 feet wide. The attack, in which several RAAF members took part, which was carried out at deck level height was a complete success and some of the bombers went in to the attack at 100 feet. The remainder attacked at not more than 500 feet. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. Aerial view of the Klong Phasi Charoen canal locks under air attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF. This canal is part of an extensive canal system in the Bangkok area which was being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route. The Klong Damneum Sadauk canal was also attacked and the damage caused by bombing to these two canals has reduced their efficiency by approximately 80%. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. Aerial view of the Klong Phasi Charoen canal locks which were attacked by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF. As a result of the attack, one set of lock gates was destroyed, another probably damaged and a number of rivercraft destroyed. The Klong Damneum Sadauk canal, which was also attacked on the same day, are part of a large waterways system in the Bangkok area being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route and the bomb damage caused by the air attacks has reduced their efficiency by approximately 80%. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. The west lock gate of the Klong Damneum Sadauk canal before a low-level daylight air attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. A similar attack was also made on the Klong Phasi Charoen canal. The canals were part of a large waterways system in the Bangkok area being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route and the bomb damage caused by the air attacks reduced their efficiency by approximately 80%. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Bangkok, Thailand. 18 April 1945. During a low-level daylight air attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command on the Klong Damneum Sadauk canal, one of the west lock gates were destroyed. This attack was directed at the extensive canal system in the Bangkok area which was being used by the Japanese as an alternative communications route. Klong Phasi Charoen was the target of a similar attack on the same day. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Gulf of Siam. 15 June 1945. A Japanese tanker under attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF off Samoi Island. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Mokpalin, Burma. 19 November 1944. The railway yards under attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. (Flight Lieutenant D. Eno?) Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Khaeng Khoi, Thailand. 2 April 1945. The railway yard and workshops under attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Smoke billows up from fires which have been started in the wagon repair shops (left centre). Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Khaeng Khoi, Thailand. 2 April 1945. The railway yard and workshops under attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Dense black smoke is coming from burning rolling-stock. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Khaeng Khoi, Thailand. 2 April 1945. The railway yard and workshops under attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Smoke is billowing from fires started in rolling-stock and repair facilities. Pictures courtesy of Australian War Memorial

Khaeng Khoi, Thailand. 2 April 1945. Bombs bursting in the railway yard and workshops during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Smoke is billowing from fires started in rolling-stock and repair facilities. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Khaeng Khoi, Thailand. 3 April 1945. Aerial view from one of the attacking RAF Liberator aircraft during the attack on the marshalling yards. Great clouds of smoke cover the target area, while a denser cloud of black smoke denotes a direct hit on an oil wagon standing in the middle of the yards. A main centre of Japanese locomotive and wagon repair facilities, seventy five miles north east of Bangkok was attacked by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. To attack this target in Siam, the RAF crews flew a total distance of 2,200 miles and carried one of the heaviest bomb loads ever taken by them on such a long daylight mission. Since the destruction of the Makasan workshops at Bangkok, Japanese were compelled to use the Khaeng Khoi repair facilities to an increasing extent. In less than an hour, these facilities had been blasted away. The first wave of aircraft smashed the big carriage shop, setting it on fire, and causing explosions throughout the target area. Three large buildings blew up after another wave had attacked, and as remaining formations dived in, warehouses, transhipment sheds and locomotive sheds crumbled and burst into flames. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Waw, Burma. 8 April 1945. Bombs bursting (centre right) during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Waw, Burma. 8 April 1945. Bombs bursting near a road bridge over the Pegu-Sittang canal, during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Burma. 8 April 1945. Bombs bursting in the Pegu-Sittang canal, during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Burma. 8 April 1945. Bombs bursting in the Pegu-Sittang canal, in the vicinity of a road-bridge during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.

Naja Ang, Burma. 17 June 1945. Bombs bursting along a railway line embankment near Naja Ang Station, during an attack by aircraft of No. 356 (Liberator) Squadron RAF of the Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command. Picture courtesy of Australian War Memorial.